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20130101
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Book TV 13
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CSPAN2 13
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 10:00am EST
protestant churches. this reinforced a second exceptional pillar, common law, which posits that god-given, or the laws given from god to the people and it bubbles up word to the rumors. it gives us the government of the people, by the people and for the people that lincoln referred to. common-law stand in stark opposition to almost every other nation on earth that has developed some form of civil law come in which law trickles down from the top. both germany and england had common-law for a while, but by the 20th century both have more or less abandoned it. germany more so than england. therefore, by the end of world war ii, when you have unloaded however unwillingly its colonies, those colonies were themselves designed on principles of civil law. us, the first two pillars taken together mean that a christian, protestant religion influenced and shaped everything about american foundation of laws and defined its system of personnel rights. it wasn't just that the united states was a democratic republic, but that the very premises of what a democratic republic meant were likely to be
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 8:30pm EST
the lawful property of southern families, namely their slaves. and there was no compromise that could erase those tensions. they had been trying to compromise the issue of slavery for three generations. they compromised over slavery when they wrote the constitution. they compromised over slavery when they passed the northwest -- opening the upper midwest. they compromised over slavery in 1820 with the famous missouri compromise. they compromised over slavery in 1850 with the fugitive slave act and in 1854 with the kansas/nebraska act. the dred scott opinion of the supreme court was supposed to be compromised, resolving the issue of slavery. they had tried and tried and tried to compromise. it had not worked and that is why the crisis came. if one nation sharing the same congress, operating under the same laws, could not compromise the issue, how could two nations side-by-side, sharing these vital arteries of commerce and communication, how could they hope to resolve the issue? and what's more, lincoln understood that if secession managed one success there would not be illogical into it. we
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 4:15pm EST
you in a bad position of the post office. but instead of saying get over it, many state laws about privacy. when supreme court dealt with the case about gps, the supreme court didn't say, hey, we have technology, get over privacy, they said -- and this is a supreme court that doesn't agree on anything, they said privacy is important. something even this minor is where you are to give away information about whether you know it or not abortion clinic, a competitor to your bosses, this information is being tracked on the web through smart phones actually have huge ramifications. it's what we do? in europe, they actually have protective laws. you can find out what data aggregators are talking about you, if you have wrong information, you can correct it. so i might be googling diabetes or a friend or a product, and not for, it doesn't mean that i'm unhealthy, but the federal trade commission is actually considering having a do not track regulation. sort of like the do not call list. i will end up with something that the trade commission that when we were on a panel together. the chairma
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:30am EST
% of the boat. the government agrees -- there's a lot, under greek law whatever party comes in first, take a step back, greece has proportional representation that deserves a word of comment. proportional representation is the peculiar idea that if you get a certain percentage of the vote in an election, you should have the same percentage of delegates in congress that right the laws. it you didn't do that you exclude the 18% that had a role to play in governing which you think is the idea. in european countries we have proportional representation. if you get more than usually a cut off of 5% to get whatever the percentage of your vote is that is how many seats you get. you all understand i assume we don't do that in united states. if you get 51% of the vote you get it all and 49% wage. we have had proportional representation in the united states in the past. when you read about primary, and they a gets 20 delegates for the convention and candidate b, that is proportional, they get an equal number of delegates, we actually recognized in the united states proportional representation, we jus
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:00pm EST
in the development of international refugee law policy. the international office of refugees who won the 1938 nobel peace prize. he yearns to -- diaspora and he was the russians could do something that can to the inspiring recent flight across the atlantic. in 1928 he decided it was up to him to do a tattered to mail in equivalent to go around the world alone by bicycle. luckily he didn't have to do that. he departed shanghai on a better bicycle but upgraded to a new bicycle in bangkok into a secondhand motorcycle in singapore. the benefactor gave him a brand-new aeriel motorcycle in karachi plus a letter the guaranteed parts and assistance in aerial offices around the world. in his published a county think the worldwide services of the ymca ,-com,-com ma shell oil and the firestone company and he depended on the global availability of gasoline, oil and food. the array of industry of good services that were now spread almost everywhere in the world. like the circumspect wing south asian diaspora he made his transit with think richmond of scattered white russians. above all there was his passport fo
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 12:45am EST
of law committee for the ocean. it is said that geography is one of the most important factors because it is the most permanent. we saw the arctic icecap drop and it appears to be opening more this session. what does this trend mean in a generation for russia and canada? >> i did go to zero chapters to it in the book. he is very provocative. in the middle of roberto they predicted china who was our ally would become our adversary geographically. also he said united europe could be a competitor for the united states. with the arctic icecap, if the arctic was open for shipping and a friend would sail the northwest passage up green land and across canada that shipping in the northern arctic that could provide alternative routes that is somewhat less of an emphasis of the indian ocean. to bring russia closer to america fundamentally. it would make canada significant you have shale guest, the tar sand and the hydropower resources with open arctic it would be that much more significant. >> i would like to offer a quick comment. to go through another level off from the decade. but with the ch
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 9:30am EST
]. after that period the rule of law was applied a little bit more broadly. not necessarily for any other reason, other than making sure that they would be no new entrants to this kind of special club. >> in the western press during this crisis or uprising in syria, it was always described as the commercial center of the country. tell us about that activity. >> for several hundred years, if not more, it was basically sort of the meeting point between europe and asia. and has always developed, was developed as a center of trade and commerce. that continued, of course throughout the centuries into the 20th century, and made it what it is in terms of its trade, in terms of its trade potential. now, it's also larger than the capital, damascus, not by much but it's a very large city. it's not just the second city. so has been a place where many traders and manufacturers as well preferred because it was historically quite a vibrant or because it was far away from the center where they might have a bit more freedom, even though that margin of freedom was not wide. >> where are you from originall
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:15am EST
be the network of a law firm that perhaps, you know, only spans from new york to los angeles. it might be a network like facebook or google. but what's striking and necessary to understand the way it manifests itself physically is that networks carry networks. you might have a global backbone company like a level three or a tata that own the strands of glass and that own the conduits that might run perhaps beside railroad tracks across the country. you might have another company, sort of a mid-sized network services company, one called hurricane electric, that might actually illuminate those strands of glass. they might own the light. ask and then you might have a goldman sachs or large law firm that buys bandwidth on that glass. so it's, you know, we often talk about b the information superhighway as if the network itself were the highway. i hike to think of it more -- i like to think of it more that a given network is a car chugging along the highway side by side with other networks because there's definitely a layering going on that's crucial to understanding the way in which the ne
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 8:30am EST
and states all across the country were beginning to institute censorship laws. and hollywood had brought in will rogers who had been in the harding cabinet and was, you know, mr. protestant. and kennedy now positioned himself as the heir protestant, the non-jew. and he made himself indispensable to the industry as such. and studio after studio hired him. at one point he ran four major studios. and at each of those he demanded to be paid in stock options. by the time he left hollywood after only a couple of years, he was a multimillionaire because he knew how to manipulate those stock options. he knew how to turn those pieces of paper into dollars, millions of dollars. and he did. at age 50 having learned how to make an advantage of a disadvantage, at age 50 he had those millions and millions and millions of dollars. and at age 50 he knew the way the stock market worked, the way stocks and bonds are traded, and he knew that a crash was coming, and he pulled out all his money so that when the crash did come, he was left with his millions. in a extraordinary position. and yet with that cras
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:00pm EST
. and the americans were skeptical. first, there were neutrality laws but there were also very strong isolationist sentiment in america. and even george marshall, who was chief military advisor to franklin roosevelt said, how can we send all these weapons to england if they're going to surrender to the british in a matter of weeks, and we end up fighting the germans? we will be charging into the face of our own weapons. but even though the operation was secret, it became headlines of course when it happened around the world. and everyone knew about it. and roosevelt and marshall were very, very effected by this. they thought if the british government can do this, they are serious. they are not going to negotiate with the germans. they're going to stay in this for as long as they possibly can. and it opened up the pathway for armaments to go to britain, which were very much needed and very much appreciated. >> brooke stoddard, when the official date of the so-called battle for britain, battle of britain? >> when were they? i think britain calls it july to the end of september, let's say. >> of 1940
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:30pm EST
. president laws of the clinton global the initiative announcing a major new direction on this topic and there are many people that work on this topic to have helped move it forward on the agenda but one of them as a lot of credit. >> we've been talking with philip auerswald, the coming prosperity, entrepreneurs are transforming the global economy. his most recent book. book tv on location at george mason university. >>> now on book tv, alex berezow argues that while antiscience is usually a term associated with conservatives, the left in the united states has plenty of problems with science when it comes to issues they don't support. it's about an hour and a half. >> my name is kenneth agreement and a resident scholar here at the enterprise institute and i work on primarily energy and environmental policy issues. i'm a scientist as well as alex and my doctoral degree is environmental science and engineering. so i am really excited to have this event today on science called "science left behind," alex's great book, and before we start, if i seem a little fuzzy you've seen the commerc
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:00pm EST
censor laws in hollywood had rotted will rogers would then departing cabinet and kennedy now positioned himself as the non-jew and made himself indispensable to the industry as such. studio after studio hired him. at one point herein for major studios in at each of those he demanded to be paid in stock options. the time he left hollywood, he was a multimillionaire and he knew how to manipulate the stock options. he knew how to turn those pieces of paper into dollars, millions of dollars and he did. at age 50 learned how to make an advantage the disadvantage and had this millions and millions and millions of dollars. at age 50 he knew how the stock market were permanently stocks and bonds are treated and he knew the crash is coming up or that all his money so when the crash did come coming here is blessed with his million and extraordinary positions. and yet, with that crash will recess. from the recession now. we all know people who are suffering, but it doesn't compare to the depression of the 30s. kennedy was scared to death at everything but the country he loved because it had given
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:00am EST
, unlike the skip tracers and bag men who, in mr. leonard's work, usually represent the law and order history. raylan is an anacreonism for town, and he shows what mr. leonard holds dear, the values he can common in different american rhythm. those of, for instance, richard ford or robert frost or even mark twain. this is a quote. please concentrate... you can cut official corners to call a man out but couldn't walk in a man's house unless ininvited or else with a warrant. it was the way he was raced, with good manners. back when he was living in the coal camp and miners struck, raylan walking a picket line, his dad in the house dying of black lung, and a couple came across the street, with pick handles, and walked up to where his mother was on the porch. they said they wanted to speak to her brother. she told them, you don't walk in a person's home unless your invited, even you people must believe that. you have homes, don't you? wifes and mothers keeping house? they shoved her aside and hit raylan with a pick handle to put him down. her words hadn't stopped them. what they did was s
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13